Pineapple After A Tooth Extraction?

If you have ever had a tooth extracted, or are in need of one, you may have heard of what NOT to do after the extraction. Things like: No smoking, spitting, or sucking through straws to prevent dry sockets. Avoiding small, grainy, or crunchy foods that can get stuck in the holes where the teeth were that inhibit healing. All of these precautions are taken to help the extraction site heal up quickly and cleanly.

So you know what not to do in order to promote healing, now what about this pineapple?

Post-extraction, eating some pineapple is good for a few reasons: It’s not grainy, so it theoretically would be harder to get stuck in the extraction sites. It’s easy to chew, so disturbing the extraction socket may not occur as easily. It’s delicious, that’s my favorite part.

More importantly raw Pineapple has high levels of Bromelain and Vitamin C–Both of which are important for healing1.

Bromelain: This is a proteolytic enzyme that has anti-inflammatory properties needed for healing wounds. This enzyme has been found to help with post-operative swelling in humans2.

Vitamin-C: This vitamin helps with the synthesis of collagen which is a critical part of the wound healing process and can also help decrease bruising and swelling3.

Summary: Pineapple fits the bill perfectly for food to eat after extraction of a tooth. It’s soft, easy to eat, lower chance of getting stuck in extraction socket, and as noted–has great stuff inside of it for healing. Now the pineapple won’t naturally cure every discomfort post-extraction, but it’s certainly something you can munch on.

The Author of this post does not assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, malpractice, negligence, or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, instructions or ideas contained. The foregoing parties will not be liable for any direct, special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages as a result of the reader’s use of this information.

  1. Brown, S. A., Coimbra, M., Coberly, D. M., Chao, J. J., & Rohrich, R. J. (2004). Oral nutritional supplementation accelerates skin wound healing: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-arm, crossover study. Plastic and reconstructive surgery114(1), 237–244. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.prs.0000128818.28425.52
  2. Williams, J. Z., and Barbul, A. Nutrition and wound healing. Surg. Clin. North Am. 83: 571, 2003.
  3. Jacob, R. A., and Sotoudeh, G. Vitamin C function and status in chronic disease. Nutr. Clin. Care 5: 66, 2002.

Basics Of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

More than just snoring, Obstructive Sleep Apnea has been shown to be associated with several other health issues including heart problems, diabetes, and of course sleep issues/tiredness5. This post was written to describe some of the terms used with OSA

A diagnosis from a Medical Doctor is needed for OSA, but dentists can help direct their patients to doctors who specialize in sleep medicine.

  1. OSA – Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A disorder where there are multiple episodes of upper airway collapse that inhibits breathing, so no oxygen is getting to the brain or body.1
  2. CPAP – Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Commonly associated with the CPAP machine that send pressurized air into the airway to help open up a collapsed airway and deliver oxygen to the lungs and hence the body2.
  3. Apnea: Temporary stoppage of breathing
  4. AHI – Apnea/Hypoapnea Index: Essentially the number of times that the body experiences no breathing per hour.
    • This is further categorized into severity based on how many times someone has a stoppage in breathing:
      • Normal= Less than 5 apnea events per hour
      • Mild= 5 to 20 apnea events per hour
      • Moderate= 20 to 40 apnea events per hour
      • Severe= 40+ apnea events per hour3
  5. MAS – Mandibular Advancement Splint: An oral appliance that attach to upper and lower jaws with the goal of moving the lower jaw forward to increase airway patency. There are several other terms for this type of splint/device all meaning about the same thing.
  6. UPPP – Uvulo-palatopharyngoplasty: This is a surgery which aims to decrease the size of the uvula and other surrounding pharyngeal structures to help open the airway4.
  7. PSG – Polysomnograph: This sleep test is considered the gold standard for evaluation of OSA and can be administered at home6
    • HSAT: Home Sleep Apnea Test

Screening for OSA is often underutilized. But getting patients who need care for OSA help can change their lives not to mention sleep better!

References:

  1. Spicuzza, L., Caruso, D., & Di Maria, G. (2015). Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and its management. Therapeutic advances in chronic disease6(5), 273–285. https://doi.org/10.1177/2040622315590318
  2. CPAP: Resources, sleep Apnea machines, & masks. Sleep Foundation. (2021, July 9). https://www.sleepfoundation.org/cpap. 
  3. Berry, R. B., Budhiraja, R., Gottlieb, D. J., Gozal, D., Iber, C., Kapur, V. K., Marcus, C. L., Mehra, R., Parthasarathy, S., Quan, S. F., Redline, S., Strohl, K. P., Davidson Ward, S. L., Tangredi, M. M., & American Academy of Sleep Medicine (2012). Rules for scoring respiratory events in sleep: update of the 2007 AASM Manual for the Scoring of Sleep and Associated Events. Deliberations of the Sleep Apnea Definitions Task Force of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Journal of clinical sleep medicine : JCSM : official publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine8(5), 597–619. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.2172
  4. Aurora, R. N., Casey, K. R., Kristo, D., Auerbach, S., Bista, S. R., Chowdhuri, S., Karippot, A., Lamm, C., Ramar, K., Zak, R., Morgenthaler, T. I., & American Academy of Sleep Medicine (2010). Practice parameters for the surgical modifications of the upper airway for obstructive sleep apnea in adults. Sleep33(10), 1408–1413. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/33.10.1408
  5. Shahar, E., Whitney, C. W., Redline, S., Lee, E. T., Newman, A. B., Nieto, F. J., O’Connor, G. T., Boland, L. L., Schwartz, J. E., & Samet, J. M. (2001). Sleep-disordered breathing and cardiovascular disease: cross-sectional results of the Sleep Heart Health Study. American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine163(1), 19–25. https://doi.org/10.1164/ajrccm.163.1.2001008
  6. Rundo, J. V. (2019). Obstructive sleep apnea basics. Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine86(9 suppl 1), 2–9. https://doi.org/10.3949/ccjm.86.s1.02 

Disclaimer

The Author of this post does not assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, malpractice, negligence, or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, instructions or ideas contained. The foregoing parties will not be liable for any direct, special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages as a result of the reader’s use of this information.

Little Jack Or Jill’s first Dental Visit (For Parents)

The big day has come (ideally when you see the first tooth erupting) for your child to visit the dentist.

What To Expect?

The first visit at the dental office should be a light-hearted and fun experience for the youngster. This is important as we are far past the days of holding children down in an attempt to keep their teeth healthy. It’s not fun for anyone… In a perfect world it is best to get radiographs or x-rays of all the teeth so we can predict any future issues or just make sure everything is coming in like it should be. A quick, but thorough, peak into the mouth to confirm the findings of the X-rays and check for cavities should happen next. Then if Jack or Jill are willing and cooperative, finish everything off with a cleaning!

How You Can Help?

A positive outlook on dental visits can go a long way when talking about the dentist with your children. We understand that in the past you may have had an unfavorable/scary experience at the dentist. Maybe you had to have a big cavity filled and before the procedure, that shot hurt. One of the worst things you can do is talk about the S Word (Shot) or N word (Needle) with your kids. The first exam will most likely not need any anesthetic anyway, so no need to get Jack or Jill all rattled before! If Jack or Jill are expecting the S Word they’re obviously going to be afraid and if they’re expecting to hurt, it’ll probably hurt more than it actually does. Expectations of something not too painful hyped up by parents can fester into a big problem and make it hard for us to help your child out.

Sometimes if I notice an apprehensive child I warn them that they might feel my fingernail that I forgot to clip on the inside of their cheek! Absolutely befuddling to Jack or Jill and they have no issues at all.

Newer Trends in Dentistry for Children:

Some cavities that children have do not even need to local anesthetic (S Word) to take care of! All the more reason to not mention it.

You may have visited the dentist with your child already and things just didn’t go as well as you or the dentist would have liked. As scary as it may seem, sometimes Jack and Jill do a whole lot better and can relax more without the parent in the room. I can’t explain why, but it’s always an option to try and want to reassure you that we will take great care of Jack or Jill!

Summary:

Expectations of pain or fun at the dentists office can go a long way in the mind of a youngster. Use it to everybody’s advantage as best as you can. Help us help you! It is an absolute treat to have a child excited to come see us.

If you have any questions feel free to reach out to me or your current dentist for answers!

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The Author of this post does not assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, malpractice, negligence, or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, instructions or ideas contained. The foregoing parties will not be liable for any direct, special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages as a result of the reader’s use of this information.

So You Chipped A tooth….

A chipped tooth can be bothersome: Maybe it has a sharp edge that your tongue keeps playing with, maybe its rather unsightly, or just maybe your child got bopped in the mouth with a basketball and you don’t know what to do… Well here’s your sign.

Most chipped teeth pose no immediate issues unless there is pain and/or sensitivity involved with the tooth. If there is pain, or a small amount of blood oozing from the tooth, try to get in with your dentist as soon as possible so they can assess what needs to happen next. If there is a small fragment missing and a few drops of blood are oozing out, your tooth may be safe and the dentist will hopefully be able to plug the micro-hole and no further treatment will be needed. If it is a large fracture/chip, a root canal may be in your future..

Interestingly, if the chip that pops off the tooth is in one piece and you can find it, the dentist may be able to bond it back into place. Store the chip in a sealed container of milk for the best outcome. If you cannot find the chip and there was a slight lip-laceration the dentist will need to confirm that the chip did not get left in the lip/cheek tissue. This can be accomplished via an x-ray and is a just-in-case measure.

Regardless if the chipped section is found or not, tooth-colored composite filling material is a quick, one appointment procedure that will take very little time and get your smile back into shape. If there is any mobility with the tooth that had been chipped the dentist may opt to splint the adjacent teeth and hold it in place for 2-4 weeks. Best case scenario is the bone heals up and locks the tooth back into place.

Fixing a small/medium chip on a tooth should be a quick and fairly painless procedure in most instances. It is wise to attempt to schedule an appointment with your dentist at your earliest convenience to prevent any negative outcomes e.g., larger sensitivity issues, root/nerve exposure, or further tooth loss.

For teeth that have larger chips, more like a fracture, further discussion will be required for treatments such as root canals, crowns, or implants.

The Author of this post does not assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, malpractice, negligence, or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, instructions or ideas contained. The foregoing parties will not be liable for any direct, special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages as a result of the reader’s use of this information.

MAGIC ERASE YOUR TEETH TO WHITENESS!?? TikTok Trend

The Scientists at TikTok have done it again.

If you have not already heard, get with the times you boomer. A trend on TikTok and other social media outlets has surfaced with individuals scrubbing their teeth with Mr. Clean’s very own Magic Eraser. The influencers of TikTok, or other viral wannabes, have uploaded videos making claims that scrubbing with the Magic Eraser has erased their stains and whitened their teeth. This Is absolutely bamboozling.

With That Said…..

I cannot find any research that shows that the scrubbing with the eraser doesn’t whiten teeth….What I did find was that there are multiple different types of Magic Erasers in the product line. Many of which have different ingredient lists than the OG Magic Eraser.

What in Tarnation is going on: The Ingredient Responsible for Whitening

Looking through scientific data there is a study published in 2015 claiming that the ingredient, Melanin Resin Foam, is capable of whitening and removing stains on Extracted teeth. This study was published in the Chinese Journal of Dental Research so I cannot confirm the validity of the study, but this is intriguing1

Other Ingredients:

The other Magic Erasers in Mr. Cleans product lineup have more ingredients than the plain old Melanin Resin Foam that is found in the original product. So I would highly advise against using Mr. Clean with Dawn, or Gain, or e.t.c.

So…are you going to try it…

I recommend against it, but so far the research is saying ON EXTRACTED TEETH THE TREND IS HARMLESS. If you are going to do the trend try your absolute hardest to not scrub your gums. Do not ingest the sponge as who knows what kind of bacterial infection can occur if this thing gets caught in your lungs or somewhere else dark inside of you. We have NO IDEA how much is too much scrubbing..so again not recommended….

Summary:

I am not condoning this trend.

Please don’t become a science experiment for us to study on the after-effects of Mr. Clean’s Sponge.

Research shows it can whiten EXTRACTED TEETH.

If you want safe, proven whitening practices, head over to your dentist or contact me directly for other options.

It’s a wild time to be alive…whiten at your own risk.

  1. Otsuka, T., & Kawata, T. (2015). Effect of Melamine Sponge on Tooth Stain Removal. The Chinese journal of dental research : the official journal of the Scientific Section of the Chinese Stomatological Association (CSA)18(4), 235–240. https://doi.org/10.3290/j.cjdr.a35148

The Author of this post does not assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, malpractice, negligence, or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, instructions or ideas contained. The foregoing parties will not be liable for any direct, special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages as a result of the reader’s use of this information.

What Is Oil Pulling?

Charcoal toothpaste, sucking on lemons, placing aspirin in your mouth – there’s never a shortage of new tips and tricks in dentistry. There’s always going to be changes and claims in medicine as well as new methods to treating disease. It’s our job as practitioners to question these ideas and find research that supports or refutes the claims that come with these new procedures. Since I’ve become a dentist, I’ve had numerous patients tell me their home remedies for preventing or treating their cavities. Most recently, I’ve heard a growing support for oil pulling. In today’s post, let’s dive in to oil pulling to decipher whether or not this method is reputable.

What Is Oil Pulling?

Oil pulling is performed by placing a tablespoon of oil in the mouth and swishing it for 20 minutes on an empty stomach. Once done, the oil should be spit out and not swallowed, as it is claimed to contain toxins from the body¹.

Spongebob Patrick GIFs | Tenor

How Does Oil Pulling Claim To Work?

There is no definitive answer on the mechanism of oil pulling, but there are hypothesis that exist. For instance, some believe that the oil promotes the hydrolysis of fat, which results in a ‘soap-like’ process that cleanses the mouth. Others claim the the viscous nature of the oils inhibits the plaque accumulation of bacteria. There’s also a belief that the oil contains antioxidants that result in an antibiotic-like effect².

Does Oil Pulling Work?

One of the fun things about this topic is there’s actually a bit of research on oil pulling and whether or not it works. A review in 2017 was performed on the available studies of this subject. In regards to dental caries (cavities), oil pulling was shown to reduce the bacteria that cause caries by up to 20%². Another study in 2015 compared different mouth rinses with oil pulling, finding that ‘The efficacy of fluoride and herbal mouth-rinses was found to be comparable while oil pulling did not provide any additional benefit to be used as an effective antimicrobial agent in reducing the bacterial colonization of an individual.³’

Oil pulling has been shown to have benefits with gum health. A study compared the differences between chlorhexidine and oil pulling, and actually found no difference between the gingival index score of the two⁴. Chlorhexidine is known to have a bad taste and leave staining, so this is largely beneficial to those who don’t want to use chlorhexidine.

Another benefit of oil pulling could be to treat xerostomia. A study in 2020 was conducted to evaluate symptom relief of oil pulling with xerostomia and found that ‘Compared to water, oil made swallowing easier, caused a pleasant mouthfeel and caused less waking up at night.⁵’

Smart Unscreen GIF - Smart Unscreen Ml GIFs

So Should I Do It?

Many of the studies that have been cited today have shown no adverse effects of oil pulling and, in fact, a lot posed benefits. That being said, oil pulling should not be used as a replacement for oral health maintenance, rather an additive. There is no current evidence that suggests oil pulling will reverse cavities or put a halt to gum disease, and it will absolutely not save you a trip to the dentist. Oil pulling sounds like a great option for those who want to avoid mouth washes such as Listerine, though it should be understood that it will not take the place of the mechanical debridement a brush and floss provides. Until then, more evidence and studies should be performed to see the true benefits oil pulling may provide for those with gum disease and dental caries.

To Summarize:

  • Oil pulling is performed by swishing different types of oils in your mouth each day (coconut, sesame, etc.)
  • There are various hypothesis for how oil pulling ‘works’
  • Oil pulling has been shown to reduce cariogenic bacteria (those that cause cavities) but not all studies confirm this finding
  • Those with gum disease could benefit from oil pulling
  • Oil pulling has other beneficial effects such as helping those who suffer from dry mouth
  • Brushing and flossing should still be performed while oil pulling

References:

¹Shanbhag V. K. (2016). Oil pulling for maintaining oral hygiene – A review. Journal of traditional and complementary medicine7(1), 106–109. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcme.2016.05.004

²Naseem, M., Khiyani, M. F., Nauman, H., Zafar, M. S., Shah, A. H., & Khalil, H. S. (2017). Oil pulling and importance of traditional medicine in oral health maintenance. International journal of health sciences11(4), 65–70.

³Jauhari D, Srivastava N, Rana V, Chandna P. Comparative Evaluation of the Effects of Fluoride Mouthrinse, Herbal Mouthrinse and Oil Pulling on the Caries Activity and Streptococcus mutans Count using Oratest and Dentocult SM Strip Mutans Kit. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent. 2015 May-Aug;8(2):114-8. doi: 10.5005/jp-journals-10005-1295. Epub 2015 Aug 11. PMID: 26379378; PMCID: PMC4562043.

⁴Gbinigie, O., Onakpoya, I., Spencer, E., McCall MacBain, M., & Heneghan, C. (2016). Effect of oil pulling in promoting oro dental hygiene: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials. Complementary therapies in medicine26, 47–54. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2016.02.011

⁵Ludwar, L., Mannel, H., Hamacher, S., Noack, M. J., & Barbe, A. G. (2020). Oil pulling to relieve medication-induced xerostomia: A randomized, single-blind, crossover trial. Oral diseases, 10.1111/odi.13752. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1111/odi.13752

Liability Statement:

The medical advice given in this blog should only be utilized by a medical professional who has received a medical degree. I am not responsible for the medical advice given in this blog and each case should be reviewed extensively with sources outside my blog. This blog is for education purposes only and is not meant as a substitute for an academic institution.

How Quickly Can You Get A Cavity?

This question can depend on a cornucopia of different reasons. You can be more susceptible to getting cavities depending on your: age, dietary habits, saliva production, genetics, medications, and the list goes on. The more susceptible you are, then theoretically cavities can attack your teeth quicker. So if you are more at risk for cavities, you should definitely be seeking out your dentist for regular check ups every six months.

We know that diets high in processed sugars can cause cavities. Bacteria in our mouth eat and process those sugars and produce acids that eat away at tooth enamel starting the cavity. Sugary, acidic drinks have a similar effect and are capable of eroding away tooth enamel, also starting the cavity.

One interesting study set out to determine how quickly cavities can form using some poor dental students as lab rats back in 1970. Luckily, I made it through dental school without having to confirm the results myself. Students were instructed to swish a sugary sucrose solution in their mouth 9 times a day just like they would with mouthwash. They were also instructed to not use any oral hygiene throughout the study, no brushing or flossing. By the 23rd day of doing this, it was apparent that cavities were starting to form on some of their teeth. After this conclusion was made, the students were back on their normal oral hygiene schedule and the cavity process stopped and remineralization of the teeth occurred.

So on paper, 23 days could be the magic number for how quickly a cavity can form. That being said everyone is different, and everyone has different risk factors for cavity formation.

Professionally speaking, never ever, for the love of god, try to repeat this study. Always try to brush twice a day, use floss and mouthwash rinses, and of course check in with your dentist every six months or so!

Refer to this link below from one of my colleagues, Caitlin Rosemann, if you would like to learn more about preventing these cavities.

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/dental-care-concerns/how-do-we-prevent-cavities

  1. Von der Fehr, F. R., Löe, H., & Theilade, E. (1970). Experimental caries in man. Caries research4(2), 131–148. https://doi.org/10.1159/000259635

The Author of this post does not assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, malpractice, negligence, or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, instructions or ideas contained. The foregoing parties will not be liable for any direct, special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages as a result of the reader’s use of this information.

Three Major Plaque Theories for Caries(Cavities)

Dental Caries, also known by the general public as cavities in teeth, is still one of the most common diseases globally. The World Health Organization estimates that 2.3 billion adults and 560 million children are affected by dental caries. The WHO also notes that caries is to a great extent preventable with a diet very low in simple sugars and adequate cleaning1. But that has proven to be easier said than done.

We know a considerable amount of people have caries, so what could be the possible hypotheses be behind them? This blog will specifically cover the microbial challenge to teeth. Diving in, first there is the Specific Plaque Hypothesis, second is the Nonspecific Plaque Hypothesis, and lastly the Ecological Plaque Hypothesis. Let’s dig a little deeper into each.

  1. The Non-Specific Plaque Hypothesis:
    • Essentially different combinations of bacteria are responsible for causing caries. So no single strain of bacteria is the causative agent2.
    • This Hypothesis has multiple papers published on the topic featuring Else Theilade and Harald Löe who also published Experimental Caries in Man in 1970
  2. The Specific Plaque Hypothesis:
    • Just as it sounds, this hypothesis assumes that only a few different bacteria are the culprits for causing cavities e.g. Streptococcus mutans or Streptococcus sobrinus amongst others3.
    • This Hypothesis was posed in 1992 in an article written by W.J Loesche
  3. The Ecological Plaque Hypothesis:
    • The ecological hypothesis might be a little trickier to wrap your head around.
    • It basically states that the teeth are in a constant flux of good and bad bacteria.
    • When bad conditions persist e.g., acidic environments and/or poor hygiene, the caries causing bacteria are allowed to thrive and destroy tooth structure.
    • The earliest publication I found for this theory was from 19944.

Which Hypothesis is right?

That’s for you to decide on your own, but usually I find the truth to be somewhere in the middle of each side of the story. These hypotheses can also be applied to how bacteria help to cause Gingivitis/Periodontal disease. Feel free to comment your thoughts!

  1. WHO TECHNICAL INFORMATION NOTE OCTOBER 2017 Sugars and Dental Caries. https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/259413/WHO-NMH-NHD-17.12-eng.pdf?sequence=1.
  2. Theilade E. (1986). The non-specific theory in microbial etiology of inflammatory periodontal diseases. Journal of clinical periodontology13(10), 905–911. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-051x.1986.tb01425.x
  3. Loesche W. J. (1992). The specific plaque hypothesis and the antimicrobial treatment of periodontal disease. Dental update19(2), 68–74.
  4.  Marsh P. D. (1994). Microbial ecology of dental plaque and its significance in health and disease. Advances in dental research8(2), 263–271. https://doi.org/10.1177/08959374940080022001

The Author of this post does not assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, malpractice, negligence, or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, instructions or ideas contained. The foregoing parties will not be liable for any direct, special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages as a result of the reader’s use of this information.

Toothbrush Review: Oral-B iO Series 9 Rechargeable Electric Toothbrush

It’s here…the Ferrari of the Crest Oral-B toothbrush lineup and this thing is slick. Granted, I received this tooth brush directly from Oral-B and after a little over a month of usage there are a few things I would like to share.

First Disclaimer: As mentioned before in my previous blog post, https://teethandchiefs.com/2021/01/31/doc-what-kind-of-toothbrush-should-i-be-using/, it’s not so much which toothbrush you brush with. You just need to be using it correctly and twice daily!

Second Disclaimer: I did receive the iO Series 9 from Oral-B as a promotional item.

Let’s start with the elephant in the room, this toothbrush retails for right around $300. But if you like pricey things that helps keep your teeth clean, this bad boy is the thing to buy.

This toothbrush has a ton of customizable features for personalization and multiple different cleaning settings which can come in handy. But what I love most about this toothbrush is it’s pressure sensing capabilities.

The Light ring below the neck of the toothbrush usually lights up to whichever personalized color you choose. When the correct amount of pressure is applied while brushing, the light ring turns green. If too much pressure is applied, the light ring will turn red indicating excessive force.

Another fun little detail Oral-B threw into this model is the smile or frown face that appears depending on how long you brush for. If you don’t reach the two minute mark, you get an unhappy face that appears on the screen. But if you do hit the two minute mark a smiley face lets you know you’ve completed the brushing.

Now I currently do not have any method to measure the difference in decibels, but this is much quieter than Oral-B’s Genius Line. I noticed this to be much more pleasing on the ears than expected. On the other hand, the Splatter Rate (how much toothpaste gets on your mirror) seems to be a little higher, but I attribute that to a better clean. This toothbrush has a bunch of helpful features, and if you’ve got a few spare hundred dollars feel free to try them out. With that said, Oral-B has different models that have similar features that essentially do the same thing.

TO BE ABSOLUTELY CLEAR: this toothbrush will only clean your teeth if you use it, just like any other toothbrush. So if you’re going to spend this much money on a toothbrush, USE IT. And if you’re not going to spend this much money on a toothbrush, buy one you like and USE IT.

The Author of this post does not assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, malpractice, negligence, or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, instructions or ideas contained. The foregoing parties will not be liable for any direct, special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages as a result of the reader’s use of this information.

Turner Tooth, Not Timmy Turner

This blog page has tried diligently to advocate for oral health and the prevention of dental cavities. This post will reiterate again why good hygiene is important even during the younger years.

A Turner Tooth is an enamel defect, a type of hypoplasia, on the outside of the tooth that results from either inflammation(caused by cavities) or injury to the primary (baby) tooth above the permanent tooth. As you can see below, the loss of enamel results in discoloration and the potential for misshaped teeth.

Neville, Brad W., et al. Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. Elsevier, 2016. 

These defects can be white, yellow, brown, and can be anywhere on the crown of the tooth. Most commonly, the changes are seen in the permanent bicuspids after carious breakdown(cavities) of primary molars. If the defect is seen in the incisor region, the cause was typically from injury or trauma to the primary incisors1.

Usually, and hopefully, only one tooth is affected. Early detection is important to prevent further disfigurement of the tooth2.

The potential for a Turner Tooth places further emphasis on why it is important to take care of all of the teeth even during the developing years!

  1. Neville, Brad W., et al. Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology. Elsevier, 2016. 
  2. Geetha Priya, P. R., John, J. B., & Elango, I. (2010). Turner’s hypoplasia and non-vitality: a case report of sequelae in permanent tooth. Contemporary clinical dentistry1(4), 251–254. https://doi.org/10.4103/0976-237X.76395

The Author of this post does not assume any liability for any injury and/or damage to persons or property as a matter of products liability, malpractice, negligence, or otherwise, or from any use or operation of any methods, instructions or ideas contained. The foregoing parties will not be liable for any direct, special, indirect, incidental, consequential, or punitive damages as a result of the reader’s use of this information.